Cryotherapy’s Cool Benefits

With the summer heat blazing, we’re all grateful for air conditioning. But could cold air provide health benefits too? According to some, cryotherapy is a chilly way to feel better.
“Cryo” comes from the Greek word “krous,” meaning “icy” or “cold.” Cryotherapy refers to the use of ice or other cold materials as treatment.
A common form of cryotherapy is the use of ice or cold packs – application to injuries causes blood vessels to constrict, reducing blood flow and alleviating pain, swelling and inflammation.
The current trend, however, is a little different. Whole body cryotherapy (WBC) involves exposing your body to low, even subzero, temperatures for between 2 and 4 minutes. Sometimes temperatures are as low as -200 degrees Fahrenheit. During the therapy, the person stands in a tank or closet-like stall, wearing minimal clothing, and is bathed in cold air or liquid nitrogen. But why? Here are some of the possible benefits:

[fullwidth backgroundcolor=”” backgroundimage=”” backgroundrepeat=”no-repeat” backgroundposition=”left top” backgroundattachment=”scroll” video_webm=”” video_mp4=”” video_ogv=”” video_preview_image=”” overlay_color=”” overlay_opacity=”0.5″ video_mute=”yes” video_loop=”yes” fade=”no” bordersize=”0px” bordercolor=”” borderstyle=”” paddingtop=”20px” paddingbottom=”20px” paddingleft=”0px” paddingright=”0px” menu_anchor=”” equal_height_columns=”no” hundred_percent=”no” class=”” id=””][flip_boxes columns=”2″ class=”” id=””][flip_box title_front=”” title_back=”” text_front=”Pain relief and muscle healing:” background_color_front=”#45afbc” title_front_color=”” text_front_color=”#ffffff” background_color_back=”#45afbc” title_back_color=”” text_back_color=”#ffffff” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_radius=”4px” icon=”” icon_color=”” circle=”yes” circle_color=”” circle_border_color=”” icon_flip=”” icon_rotate=”” icon_spin=”yes” image=”” image_width=”35″ image_height=”35″ animation_type=”slide” animation_direction=”left” animation_speed=”0.7″]Like ice packs, cold air may help increase blood circulation, promoting healing and lessening pain.
[/flip_box][flip_box title_front=”” title_back=”” text_front=”Weight loss:” background_color_front=”#45afbc” title_front_color=”” text_front_color=”#ffffff” background_color_back=”#45afbc” title_back_color=”” text_back_color=”#ffffff” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_radius=”4px” icon=”” icon_color=”” circle=”yes” circle_color=”” circle_border_color=”” icon_flip=”” icon_rotate=”” icon_spin=”yes” image=”” image_width=”35″ image_height=”35″ animation_type=”slide” animation_direction=”left” animation_speed=”0.7″]Some claim that cryotherapy can help increase metabolism, supporting weight loss.
[/flip_box][flip_box title_front=”” title_back=”” text_front=”Reducing anxiety and depression:” background_color_front=”#45afbc” title_front_color=”” text_front_color=”#ffffff” background_color_back=”#45afbc” title_back_color=”” text_back_color=”#ffffff” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_radius=”4px” icon=”” icon_color=”” circle=”yes” circle_color=”” circle_border_color=”” icon_flip=”” icon_rotate=”” icon_spin=”yes” image=”” image_width=”35″ image_height=”35″ animation_type=”slide” animation_direction=”left” animation_speed=”0.7″]According to some preliminary research, cryo can help reduce inflammation, which is linked to some mental health conditions.[/flip_box][flip_box title_front=”” title_back=”” text_front=”Treating migraines:” background_color_front=”#45afbc” title_front_color=”” text_front_color=”#ffffff” background_color_back=”#45afbc” title_back_color=”” text_back_color=”#ffffff” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_radius=”4px” icon=”” icon_color=”#ffffff” circle=”no” circle_color=”” circle_border_color=”#ffffff” icon_flip=”” icon_rotate=”” icon_spin=”no” image=”” image_width=”35″ image_height=”35″ animation_type=”slide” animation_direction=”left” animation_speed=”0.7″]A 2013 study found that cryotherapy applied to the necks of people who had migraines reduced their pain.
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Pregnant women, children or people with high blood pressure or heart conditions should not try cryotherapy, and it must be done in a professional setting (aka, you won’t get the same results squeezing into the grocer’s freezer). The FDA has not yet approved cryotherapy as a medical treatment, so research your options, and talk to your doctor before you try it out.
Source: Forbes, Medical News Today

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